Photos: Shaden Mousa

Photos: Shaden Mousa

For more than two decades, my work has explored the gaps between knowledge and experience. Making art helps me to understand how identity emerges in a space of uncertainty and attempts to fill it with words, memories, and evidence.

My recent work takes the form of diagrammatic sculptures. I often begin by thinking of my flesh-and-bone body like a planet in space. I measure and map my latitudes, perimeters, rotations, and orbits, and translate this information through quiet but labor-intensive processes. I am seeking an elusive moment when what is exact in the mind becomes fluid in the hand.

Some of my research interests are multiplicity, unity, and symmetry and in how mathematical processes are embedded in our biology and perception, influencing our tacit understanding of the world. I combine these ideas with influences from my childhood in rural Pennsylvania, where cycles of nature impressed upon me a sense of fluidity and repetition, growth and decay. Fiber techniques are well suited to this study, as they can signify the body, an abject accumulation of time, and domesticity. Specifically, in 1997 Cornell University mathematician Dr. Daina Taimina discovered that crochet, in spite of its reputation for Victorian flourishes, has the unique capacity to model fractal growth and non-Euclidian, hyperbolic space, key features of quantum physics.